Gimme Life, Gimme Love

Great music, great people, great cause!

family shot

Gimme Life, Gimme Love is a benefit gig raising funds for local Monbulk mum Sherie Lucas who is in urgent need of life-saving brain surgery.

Featuring a bevy of local musicians including:

·  Kristy Lewis (Rockabilbies)
·  The Barebones
·  Warships
·  Victor Cripes
·  Curds and Grain
·  Lost Canoe
·  Matt Walker
·  Agents of Fortune (feat. Dave Larkin from Dallas Crane)

 Happening Sunday October 15 from 1pm until 10pm all proceeds go directly to the Lucas family to help with ongoing medical expenses. Tickets are $15 on the door or pre-book via sookielounge.com.au. This is a family friendly event with kids entry free of charge.

Sherie Lucas has suffered 3 strokes, since January 2016, caused by a rare brain cavernous hermangioma. The strokes have effected many of her physical functions and without further surgery the next stroke could potentially end her life or cause disablement which may see her in a wheel chair for the rest of her life.

However….there is hope! Renowned Australian brain surgeon, Dr Charlie Teo is confident that he can treat Sherie’s condition with a 50% chance of needing rehabilitation. The major catch is that as Dr Teo operates out of the Prince of Whales Private Hospital, Sydney and the cost is high. Sherie’s husband Jules created a gofundme campaign around a month ago to raise the $100k needed and the response has been phenomenal.

We decided to create a family friendly event to help raise money for the cause by getting a bunch of great local Musos together and make a day of it.

If you can’t make it but still want to donate, head to the family’s Go Fund Me page
https://www.gofundme.com/uyscg-save-my-wife

Gimme-Life-Gimme-Love-15-Oct

For more info see:

9 News media: 

9-news

 7 News media: ‘Save my wife’: Dad’s emotional plea after wife has three strokes.

Channel 7

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burrinja makes the top ten

burrinja-sky

Post by Adriana Alvarez.

It looks like the secret is out. Burrinja is one of the top ten places to visit in Melbourne according to UK Guardian. The post by their Australian reporter mentions it in regard to getting in touch with “traditional owners” making reference to Lin Onus’ Fish and Leaves artwork as one of it’s highlights as well as exhibitions, music and theatre.

Burrinja Cultural Centre

And indeed Burrinja is a great place to see indigenous art as it manages a rare public collection of over 600 items of Aboriginal and oceanic art from Papua New Guinea. The collection was donated to the Shire of Yarra Ranges in 2001 by Neil McLeod, a local resident and renowned photographer, book author and field collector.

But this is not the only thing on offer at Burrinja.With multiple gallery spaces for touring exhibitions, a large 400 seat theatre for live productions and artist studios and workshop rooms, it’s a hub for creative locals who can find great inspiration within it’s walls. With workshops and activities for people of all ages and abilities Burrinja encourages community engagement and inclusion. It’s support of local artists, projects (like the hillscene magazine and hillseneLIVE), festivals and events fosters a vibrant creative community, living up to it’s mission of “creating community through the Arts”.

Burrinja GalleryBurrinja theatre

A visit to Burrinja isn’t complete without wandering through the Art of Place Indigenous Cultural Garden, a place to reflect, learn about and celebrate the local indigenous culture. Take in one of it’s many exhibitions, grab a gift in the gallery shop, see a show or enjoy a great coffee and meal at the Skylark Room which features brilliant music in the evenings and weekends.

Skylark Room food

So it looks like is right in naming Burrinja, one of the top ten treasures in the ‘world’s most livable city’. And we’re lucky to have it right on our doorstep.

Find out more and see what’s on at Burrinja here.

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Belgrave Survival Day – Celebrating 10 years

smoking-ceremonySmoking ceremony photo by D.Clarke.

On Thursday the 26th January, 2017, Belgrave Survival Day will celebrate its 10th consecutive year. Once again celebrating Indigenous culture and the survival of Australia’s First Nations people through 228 years of white settlement. This year’s festival will focus on the theme of ‘Knowing your local history, and as always is a free family friendly event.

This year the theme focuses on understanding your local history. If there is one action a person can do to show solidarity and start to bridge the gap between indigenous and non-indigenous people it is to get to know your local history. This year award winning author Bruce Pascoe will be a special guest speaker sharing stories from our local history. Author and historian Jim Poulter will also have a stall with books outlining Victoria’s indigenous history.

The Welcome to Country and smoking ceremony will be led by Wurundjeri elder and educator, Uncle Bill Nicholson, followed by traditional dances performed by ‘The Djirri Djirri’ dance mob where the audience will be invited to join in. Aunty Dot Peters will also grace us with her presence and share some of her wisdom.

Djirri Djirri Dance Group courtesy of their facebook pageThe Djirri Djirri dance mob.

The line up includes Benny Walker, who will be on the stage again as the lead act with his band. His love songs and epic tales are mixed with passion for the land, the people. His summer vibes and deep grooves are elements that reach the soul.

Benny Walker and BandBenny and the band.

The day will also welcome back The Deans, who will bring classic sounds and grooves with velvet smooth vocals, sweet harmonies, soaring heartbreak guitar, deep Mo-town bass grooves and hip-shaking rhythms. They are sure to get you moving.

Benny and The Deans will be supported by Gunditjmara singer songwriter Jayden Lillyst. Jayden tells stories of his people through a dose of country rock mixed with soul and blues.

The fabulous voices of the Mullum Mullum Choir and the vibes of the Hip Hop Crew will also feature. Then be calmed as you participate in a Digeridoo Mediation with Gnarnayarrahe Waitiarie (Uncle Joey).

There will be plenty of activities to keep the kids (and adults) busy with fun music and dance, art and craft opportunities, the children’s playground and more.

Soak up the atmosphere on a picnic rug in front of the stage or stroll around the market and information stalls. Catering for all food requirements with a variety of food trucks including traditional bush tucker. This event is alcohol-free.

Due to parking limitations around the park the Survival Day organisers strongly encourage people to catch public transport, carpool or park at Belgrave Train Station where you can get the shuttle bus provided, or take a quick 5 minute walk to Borthwick Park.

The event will be simulcasts on 3MDR 97.1 FM.

To find out more go to Belgrave Survival Day facebook or events page

When: 26th January 2017
Time: 12 noon – 4.30pm
Where: Borthwick Park (next to Belgrave Pool) Benson St, Belgrave.
Melways reference 75/F11

final-survival-day-2017-26-10-16

The Belgrave Survival Day event is organised by a committee of volunteers. They invite new volunteers to help with preparations for the festival, to assist on the day, or join the committee to keep the event happening in the future.

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Creative Opportunities

Eliza-and-Ben-Phillips-Doll

At the hillscene we often get people sending us their information to share with our talented community so here are a few creative opportunities that are on the horizon…

Applications for Dandenong Ranges Open Studios 2016 close on Monday the 5th of October.

The Open Studios weekend is one of the most anticipated events for the region’s cultural calendar, attracting art minded visitors and tourists since 2004. The Dandenong Ranges Open Studios program provides a unique insight into our artists’ work environments as well as their art.
There are 5 funded Emerging Artist spaces available. For more information go to Dandenong Ranges Open Studios.

Collective Consciousness – End of the Line group exhibition

Collective Consciousness is an outdoor exhibition located in BlackSmiths Way. Participating artists will be provided with a plywood board 90cmX 120cm that can be collected from Limerence between 22 September to 31st of October* – 10am to 5pm. Each board is attached to a large fence upon installation on the morning of the festival. Please note that holes will be drilled into corners of the boards so we can attach them to the fence.
Your job as the artist is to spread your creative wonderment on the board in any medium you like, using any subject matter you like! Just please keep in mind that the work will be displayed in a public space so it needs to be safe, any objects must be securely attached to the board and the work should be weather proof – just in case we end up having  to rain dance on the day!
Please note that you will be required to drop off your artwork for the Collective Consciousness exhibition at Limerence (1642 Burwood Hwy, Belgrave) between the 3 to 20 November* – 10am to 5pm.
*Closed on Sunday and Monday

The Doll House – End of the Line group exhibition

We would love to assemble a collection of handmade dolls in a tiny and curious exhibition space… they can be as lovely or creepy as you like! We just ask that these “people”… erm, I mean artworks, be no larger than 40cm squared.
Please note that you will be required to drop off the artwork for The Doll House exhibition at Limerence (1642 Burwood Hwy, Belgrave) between the 20 October to 3 November* – 10am to 5pm.
*Closed on Sunday and Monday

If you would like to take part in one or more of the End of the Line group exhibitions please email the following details to amym@burrinja.org.au
Artist Name:
Group Exhibition you want to take part in:
Do you fancy lending us a hand installing the exhibitions?

Studio Space Available at Burrinja

Studio 3 is available at Burrinja from the 1st of December. For more details go to Burrinja studios.

The Regional Exhibitions Program is now accepting proposals for the 2016 program.

The program exhibits at:

  • The Memo Gallery at The Memo, Healesville
  • The Studio at the Arts Centre, Warburton
  • Red Earth Gallery at the Mooroolbark Community Centre

The Regional Exhibitions program is a valued part of the Arts, Culture & Heritage Department in the Yarra Ranges Council. Consisting of three galleries, these vibrant spaces are situated within multi-disciplinary art and community centres aimed to inspire and foster the community.

The Regional Exhibitions Program every year exhibits local, national and international exhibitions from established and emerging practitioners.

For all the information you need go to www.culturetracks.info. Get in touch with Jade Bitar, Regional Exhibitions Officer on 03 5965 3509 / 0419 384 526 or email exhibitions@yarraranges.vic.gov.au if you have any questions.

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Eva Glac artwork for "tencity of Change" exhibition

Burrinja Climate Change Biennale

Eva Glac artwork for

Australian Black Bean Pod by Eva Glac

Post by Ross Farnell

Art prize – $3,000.  Entries close August 10, 2015  LWCC high res text

A brand new art prize opportunity has just been announced, and it’s coming from our own Hills community!

The Burrinja Climate Change Biennale acquisitive art prize is a key project of the Living with Climate Change program which recently featured in our Hillscene Winter edition.

In keeping with the program’s theme of exploring through art and creative expression the changes we see on our near horizon, the Burrinja Biennale invites works that respond to themes of climate change both locally – in the Dandenong Ranges – but also nationally and globally.

Works may be across any visual arts medium, from sculpture to new media, oils to textiles; in fact any preferred medium you work with.

The Burrinja Climate Change Biennale strives to elicit authentic, non-directed audience responses to art works and the ways in which they provoke responses and contribute to the critical debate and cultural conversations surrounding climate change. That can be across the whole range of intersecting impacts: climate, flora and fauna, built environment, social and cultural change.

The Biennale is an immersive and experiential exhibition incorporating direct and online audience responses and incorporating ongoing responsive art-making activities together with the exhibition. So Burrinja is keen to source art works that draw the viewer into an active response, to think and engage with the local and global implications of climate change.

By revisiting the theme via an acquisitive award exhibition every two years, Burrinja is looking forward to building a valuable cultural and historic archive of our changing responses to climate change over the years. How will our artists be viewing and portraying their contemporary community’s responses to and changed realities of living with climate change in ten, twenty or fifty years’ time?

The award and exhibition are designed to explore and challenge ideas through creative endeavour, expressions and dialogue, allowing the conversation about their own environment to evolve, develop and extend over time. In doing so, we will create a valuable historical record of those creative responses for our community to reflect upon.

If you’re keen to create a new work that responds to this theme, or have created a work in the past two years that addresses or intersects with climate change, then here’s how you can be a part of the Burrinja Climate Change Biennale.

Visit www.burrinja.org.au and follow the links from the home page to the Burrinja Climate Change Biennale. Here you’ll find all the terms and conditions, program information, and the link for the on-line application form.

So… get busy all you creatives out there!!

KEY DATES

Deadline extended!! Entries Close – August 17, 2015
Finalists Notified – September 14
Exhibition Opening & Acquisitive Award – Sunday October 11
Exhibition Dates – October 3 to January 31, 2016

Tiffany Morris North

Shedding by Tiffany Morris North

Photos courtesy of Burrinja are artworks from The Dandenong Ranges Open Studios exhibition “The Tencity of Change”.

This project is generously supported by a Shire of Yarra Ranges Arts and Heritage Development Grant.

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Black Saturday Recollections

The Art of Response: fireman

Post by Gareth Hart.

The Art of Response: Recording and Collecting Black Saturday is the newest exhibition at the Yarra Ranges Regional Museum.

As you enter the gallery, you are greeted with the following description:

This exhibition explores how artistic and collecting practices have been used across Yarra Ranges by some individuals, communities and institutions in response to Black Saturday. Through artworks and objects, many of the less tangible challenges faced by fire affected communities are revealed. The artefacts and artworks that are kept and created reflect part of the human side of the storyhow fire can transform not only objects and landscapes, but lives.

Balck Saturday exhibition at Yarra Ranges Regional Museum

It is a fascinating curatorial choice for an exhibition: placing found and artistic objects side by side, and considering how they can be used as signifiers and respondents for a tragic event of historical importance.

Works of mixed media, traditional art form and found objects fill the gallery space – and through their presence I am aware of a dense experience of scale – the gallery is relatively small in size, some of the work is large in scale, and the subject matter huge beyond comprehension.

As I wander through the gallery, I encounter pieces that catch my eye, not for their aesthetic value per se, but for the journey they have undergone to be a part of this exhibition. They are works of extreme beauty, I am particularly thinking upon a collage of rusty metal, glass fragments and ceramic pieces of crockery, which during the fire melted and fused themselves together. It is abstract art at its most profound – a piece of sculpture that owes much of its beauty to Mother Nature, whilst at the same time this environmental influence speaks bounds to a much darker experience.

Black Saturday exhibition at Yarra Ranges Regional Museum

I also encounter the profundity of simplicity – glass bottles that withstood intense amounts of heat recreating themselves as melted pieces of glass sculpture. I cannot help be reminded of Salvador Dali’s melting clocks.

Each piece of art on the walls, be that painting, film, felting, etc, was created by artists living locally, in response to the events of Black Saturday. As each piece has its own visual reference to that day, so do the stories behind the creations. One I was quite taken by was Ali Griffin’s description of her stunning piece ‘Acceptance 1’, which reads:

I went back to the studio and started writing these questions and my answers to them on the canvas. I wrote about accepting what happens, and learning from what I was writing. Then, as usual, I poured shellac over the top of the writing and it disappeared. I nearly cried. A few minutes later I realised I’d just learnt an incredibly valuable lesson. I just needed to accept what had happened.

And yet underneath all of this, is the strength of a community: the resilience of artists to use their practice as an expressive tool for complex emotions/experiences, and a way for the arts to provide an insight and context into a tragic event.

Black Saturday exhibition Yarra Ranges Regional Museum

I leave the gallery incredibly confused, but this is not a reflection of the work or the curation of the exhibition. I am deeply moved to confusion, pondering how such incredible devastation can produce such a culturally relevant and reflective appropriation of community values, events and spirit.

The Art of Response: Recording and Collecting Black Saturday is exhibiting until Sunday, June 15 at the Yarra Ranges Regional Museum, Castella Street, Lilydale

Black Saturday exhibition

“Is honesty the best policy?”

Post by Zoë-Amber Preston.

Abandoned honesty shop caravan

Having grown up in the Dandenong Ranges, I often find myself surrounded by kind-hearted, honest people. As you drive along our rolling hills you may notice that there are those who share their home-grown goods with love and trust by using the ‘honesty box’ system. An honesty box allows you to take part in a community tradition of sharing. It is also a unique opportunity to try out local food; free of chemicals and filled with love.

A few weekends ago, my Dad and I explored the lovely streets of the hills looking for honesty boxes. We had some trouble at first, because a few of the boxes that had been recommended to us had been abandoned. I wondered what had caused them to close. Was this the result of thievery or troubles looking after the store, or perhaps the change in seasons or environment had prompted their closing.

After stopping for lunch in Emerald we hit the road again with great determination. We were pleasantly surprised to find plenty of honesty boxes that people have spent so much time looking after. To me, honesty boxes really reflect the feeling of spring. I love the sunny weather, bright colours, and fantastic feeling when you buy a bunch of flowers or a delicious treat that was made by the local community.

Sweet eez oranges

Hancock’s Daffodils

I chose to photograph honesty boxes because they are something that people don’t often take notice of.  Seeing one on the side of the road always makes me curious to see what is being sold. I thought it would be a good opportunity to discover more of the hills and appreciate how some people put so much of their time into them. Dad and I had a fantastic day exploring the hills and finding out more about our charming community!

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Zoë-Amber Preston is a creative young artist and writer living in the hills. She has had an article published in Hillscene magazine and spends a lot of her time drawing and taking photos in her lovely forest home.

To see some of her art visit her Facebook page: Zoe Amber Photography and Drawing

Glengower farm